Elevating Devices

Certificate Of Operation – Annual Fees

Type of devices Fees GST SCC Fees Total
Elevators
Dumbwaiters $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Escalator $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Roped Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Traction (10 Floors or less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Traction (11 Floors or greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Freight Platform - Type A $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight Platform - Type B $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Inclined Passenger Lift $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Stair Chair $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Stair Platform $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Ball Screw $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Roped Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Trac $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Ball Screw $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Roped Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Trac $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Vertical Enclosed $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Vertical Unenclosed $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Belt Lift $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Rack & Pinion $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Trac $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Type $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Hydraulic - LULA (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Hydraulic - LULA (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Roped Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Roped Hydraulic - LULA $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Tillier Traction (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Tillier Traction (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Traction - LULA (10 Floors or Less $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Traction - LULA (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Traction - MRL (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Traction - MRL (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Traction (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Traction (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Personnel Hoist (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Personnel Hoist (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Speedramp $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Speedwalk $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40

Certificates Of Construction Fees (Including Plans Review)

Certificate of Construction for: Fees GST Total
(a) a passenger elevator, freight elevator or personnel hoist - - -
- (i) that serves 10 floors or fewer $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
- (ii) that serves more than 10 floors $400.00 $20.00 $420.00
(b) a freight platform lift $150.00 $7.50 $157.50
(c) a dumbwaiter $100.00 $5.00 $105.00
(d) an escalator or moving walk $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(e) a belt lift $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(f) a power manlift $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(g) an inclined passenger lift $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(h) lifts for persons with physical disabilities (public building) $50.00 $2.50 $52.50

Certificate Of Alteration Fees

The fee for the Certificate of Alteration with respect to an elevating fixed conveyance will be 50% of the fee for the applicable Certificate of Construction plus GST.

Initial Inspection Fees

The fee for the initial inspection will be $135.00 plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Officer assigned to the initial inspection. Travel time will be at a rate of $100.00 per hour (plus GST) plus travel expenses incurred at the current rate of AEDARSA’s subsistence allowances (i.e. hotel accommodations, mileage, meals, etc).

Fees For Inspections Beyond Regular Working Hours

Available 8HRS/Day, 40HRS/Week and Statutory Holidays. Inspections performed during overtime hours (on non-statutory holidays) are 1.5 times the regular hourly rate plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Officer assigned to the inspection plus travel expenses. Inspections performed on statutory holidays are 2 times the regular hourly rate plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Officer assigned to the inspection plus travel expenses.

Accident Investigation Fees

The fee for accident investigation will be $135.00 plus GST per hour for each Safety Codes Officer assigned to an accident investigation. Travel time will be at the rate of $100.00 per hour (plus GST) plus travel expenses incurred at the current rate of AEDARSA’s subsistence allowances (i.e. hotel accommodations, mileage, meals, etc). NOTE: AEDARSA may waive the fee for an accident investigation.

Special Inspection Fees

The fee for a special inspection performed on behalf of the owner when:

  • requested by the owner
  • there is a failure to comply with an inspection request
  • confirmation of an identified deficiency has been corrected is required

There will be $135.00 plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Office assigned to the inspection. Travel time will be at the rate of $100.00 per hour (plus GST) plus travel expenses incurred at the current rate of AEDARSA’s subsistence allowances (i.e. hotel accommodations, mileage, meals, etc).

Interest Charges On Overdue Accounts

Payment terms on all invoices issued by AEDARSA are NET 30 days. An interest rate of 18% per annum (or 1.5% monthly) will be charged on overdue accounts.

Other Fees

Record Searches Fee: $100.00 plus GST per device to a maximum of $500.00 plus GST

Fee Increases

Fees may be adjusted by the Alberta Elevating Devices and Amusement Ride Board of Directors, provided that increases do not exceed the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the Province of Alberta as published by Statistics Canada since the last fee increase.

Certificate Of Operation – Annual Fees

Type of devices Fees GST SCC Fees Total
Elevators
Dumbwaiters $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Escalator $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Roped Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Traction (10 Floors or less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight - Traction (11 Floors or greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Freight Platform - Type A $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Freight Platform - Type B $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Inclined Passenger Lift $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Stair Chair $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Stair Platform $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Ball Screw $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Roped Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Enclosed - Trac $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Ball Screw $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Roped Hydro $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - VER Unenclosed - Trac $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Vertical Enclosed $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
LPPD - Vertical Unenclosed $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Belt Lift $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Rack & Pinion $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Trac $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Manlift - Power - Type $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Drum $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Hydraulic - LULA (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Hydraulic - LULA (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Roped Hydraulic $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Roped Hydraulic - LULA $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Tillier Traction (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Tillier Traction (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Traction - LULA (10 Floors or Less $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Traction - LULA (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Traction - MRL (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Traction - MRL (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Passenger - Traction (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Passenger - Traction (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Personnel Hoist (10 Floors or Less) $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Personnel Hoist (11 Floors or Greater) $151.71 $7.59 $12.00 $171.30
Speedramp $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40
Speedwalk $98.48 $4.92 $12.00 $115.40

Certificates Of Construction Fees (Including Plans Review)

Certificate of Construction for: Fees GST Total
(a) a passenger elevator, freight elevator or personnel hoist - - -
- (i) that serves 10 floors or fewer $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
- (ii) that serves more than 10 floors $400.00 $20.00 $420.00
(b) a freight platform lift $150.00 $7.50 $157.50
(c) a dumbwaiter $100.00 $5.00 $105.00
(d) an escalator or moving walk $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(e) a belt lift $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(f) a power manlift $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(g) an inclined passenger lift $200.00 $10.00 $210.00
(h) lifts for persons with physical disabilities (public building) $50.00 $2.50 $52.50

Certificate Of Alteration Fees

The fee for the Certificate of Alteration with respect to an elevating fixed conveyance will be 50% of the fee for the applicable Certificate of Construction plus GST.

Initial Inspection Fees

The fee for the initial inspection will be $135.00 plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Officer assigned to the initial inspection. Travel time will be at a rate of $100.00 per hour (plus GST) plus travel expenses incurred at the current rate of AEDARSA’s subsistence allowances (i.e. hotel accommodations, mileage, meals, etc).

Fees For Inspections Beyond Regular Working Hours

Available 8HRS/Day, 40HRS/Week and Statutory Holidays. Inspections performed during overtime hours (on non-statutory holidays) are 1.5 times the regular hourly rate plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Officer assigned to the inspection plus travel expenses. Inspections performed on statutory holidays are 2 times the regular hourly rate plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Officer assigned to the inspection plus travel expenses.

Accident Investigation Fees

The fee for accident investigation will be $135.00 plus GST per hour for each Safety Codes Officer assigned to an accident investigation. Travel time will be at the rate of $100.00 per hour (plus GST) plus travel expenses incurred at the current rate of AEDARSA’s subsistence allowances (i.e. hotel accommodations, mileage, meals, etc). NOTE: AEDARSA may waive the fee for an accident investigation.

Special Inspection Fees

The fee for a special inspection performed on behalf of the owner when:

  • requested by the owner
  • there is a failure to comply with an inspection request
  • confirmation of an identified deficiency has been corrected is required

There will be $135.00 plus GST per hour per Safety Codes Office assigned to the inspection. Travel time will be at the rate of $100.00 per hour (plus GST) plus travel expenses incurred at the current rate of AEDARSA’s subsistence allowances (i.e. hotel accommodations, mileage, meals, etc).

Interest Charges On Overdue Accounts

Payment terms on all invoices issued by AEDARSA are NET 30 days. An interest rate of 18% per annum (or 1.5% monthly) will be charged on overdue accounts.

Other Fees

Record Searches Fee: $100.00 plus GST per device to a maximum of $500.00 plus GST

Fee Increases

Fees may be adjusted by the Alberta Elevating Devices and Amusement Ride Board of Directors, provided that increases do not exceed the increase in the Consumer Price Index (CPI) for the Province of Alberta as published by Statistics Canada since the last fee increase.

 

View the Common Directives listing for Elevating Devices

 COMMON DIRECTIVES LISTING – ELEVATORS

To Owners of Single Bottom Cylinder(July 2016)

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Major and Minor Alterations Guidelines

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NOTICE – Elevating Devices Codes Regulation AR 192/2015

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February 1, 2011 ADVISOR

Re: General Elevator Corporation Aluminum Cylinder Head Issue

Vintage: From 1974 to 1982 (approximately)

To: All Industry Elevator Companies and Elevator Safety Bureau

General Elevator Sales and Service, Inc. (“GESS”) recently discovered a failure in the Aluminum Cylinder Head which had been manufactured by General Elevator Corporation. The failure was discovered in a hydraulic pressure test where the packing box housing separated from the housing. GESS was not the manufacturer or installer of the product and is not related to General Elevator Corporation who is believed to have manufactured and installed the Aluminum Cylinder Heads during the period of approximately 1974 through 1982. GESS is not aware of the cause of the failure, but is providing this notice to the Industry so that elevator companies may inspect the Aluminum Cylinder Heads manufactured by General Elevator Corporation to make sure they are not damaged and/or determine whether the heads should be replaced with steel cylinder heads.

ED_SafetyAdvisor_ElevatorSafetyAlert20110201

June 24, 2009 ADVISOR

Elevator Oil Line Shut-off Valve

Hydraulic Supply Line Shut-off Valves installed in the 1970′s

Due to a recent accident involving a hydraulic elevator shut-off valve, ThyssenKrupp Elevator Americas Business Unit investigated and discovered similar shut-off valves on units we maintain in the United States. These valves were not distributed by our factory, but may have been a locally sourced item when AHJ’s required an additional shut-off valve be installed in the system.

ThyssenKrupp Elevator Canada Ltd. is not aware of the use of this valve on out equipment or other existing elevator equipment we maintain. As a precaution we have distributed the attached safety alert to our maintenance personnel. They need to be aware of the potential issues and report any similar shut-off valves they may encounter to their supervisor, so we can approach the owners to arrange replacement.

Please feel free to use this information as you see fit, and contact us if you require additional information regarding the enclosed.

Background: In the 1970′s line shutoff valves similar to the one pictured below were used during some elevator installations and/or replacements. To the best of our knowledge, these valves were purchased locally and were not manufactured by an elevator company. These valves were approved and accepted for elevator use by the AHJs back at that time. However, a recent accident involving an elevator mechanic with an independent company clearly indicates that our field personnel need to be familiar with how this valve operates, and the risks presented if it is not properly opened or closed.

ED_SafetyAdvisor_ElevatorShutOffValve

Issue: There are two potential safety issues with this valve. First, there is a nut on the bottom of the valve that must first be loosened and then the shaft tapped up to loosen the internal valve body before closing. After this is done, the elevator personnel can then turn the top to close the valve. At that point the nut must be tightened again to hold the closed position. Going through the preliminary steps of loosening and then tapping the valve to unseat the internal body is not required on all valves. Thus we must make sure that all of our field personnel our familiar with the requirements of this type of valve. Simply putting a wrench to the valve in an attempt to close it can cause the valve to break and the complete loss of pressure.

Second, the threads on the shaft are composed of a relatively soft metal, so over time the threads on this valve can strip due to wear and tear. When this occurs the integrity of the threaded piece may become compromised.

To address the risks associated with this type of valve, many installers put a U-bolt clamp around the valve (pictured) to stiffen it and prevent the valve from being closed improperly.

The recent tragic accident involving one of these valves indicates that we need to advise all of our field personnel about the risks posed by these valves if they are not operated properly, and also advise them of the steps required before even working on such a valve.

Action: TKE employees should under no circumstances work on this type of valve without the elevator being secured on landing blocks or suspended, and the oil line being relieved of pressure. This includes removal of the U-bolt clamp. No U-bolt clamp should be removed without landing or suspending the car.

A copy of this Safety Alert should be affixed right to any valve of this design maintained by ThyssenKrupp Elevator. Please put this alert in plastic sleeve, and attach it to the pit valve.

Safety Advisor Elevator Shut-Off Valve Safety Alert

July 17, 2006 ADVISOR

Re: Manual Reset Procedure for the Hollister Whitney Rope Gripper

From: Hollister Whitney Elevator Corp.

To: Manufacturers of Elevator Controls

ISSUE: ASME / B44 Requirements 2.19.1.2 (a) (4) and 2.19.2.2 (a) (4), require that if the Rope Gripper is triggered because of a fault, it must be manually reset. Hollister Whitney assumes that these requirements are in place so that a qualified technician assesses and corrects the fault before the car is placed back into service.

POTENTIAL PROBLEM: If a technician does not correct the fault before the car is returned to service (Rope Gripper is reset), it is possible that the car can begin to move. If the fault was caused by a brake failure, it is possible that the car could reach high speeds, and/or fall into the pit or overhead before it is stopped.

RECOMMENDATION: Elevator control manufacturers should understand this situation and make sure that in their Rope Gripper reset procedure there is a provision to give the technician control over the potential for a car to fall up or down when the Rope Gripper is manually released (reset).

One solution might be to have a maintained pressure button for Rope Gripper reset. Release of this button prior to some short preset period of time would then reapply the Rope Gripper

If you have any questions about this bulletin, please call Hollister Whitney at 217-222-0466

December 5, 2002 ADVISOR US Elevator Ascension 2000 Controls

Re: US Elevator Ascension 2000 Hydraulic Elevator Controls Risks Associated with Testing/Trouble Shooting Solid State Controls

To: All Elevator Contractors and Accredited Agencies

Our files: 5703-1, 5751-1

BACKGROUND

We were recently advised that on an initial inspection of a hydraulic elevator with Ascension 2000 controls in another jurisdiction, an inspector found the door monitor circuit to be functioning properly when first tested. During subsequent redundancy tests, printed circuit boards of the control were damaged when jumpers were placed on the wrong terminals. After the damage was repaired, door monitoring was again tested and found not to be functioning.

SAFETY ISSUE

An investigation revealed that the door monitor circuit can be turned on and off. It seemed that when jumpers for testing redundancy were put on the wrong terminals the setting for the door monitor circuit was turned off. During an investigation it was discovered that the door monitor circuit can also be turned off with the maintenance tool.

ANALYSIS

Putting jumpers in the wrong control circuits might have caused the door monitoring to be turned off. However, while it may be expected that the feature is intentionally turned “off” for construction purposes to be turned “on” before the device is placed in service, the final step could be missed. Given this scenario, assuming maintenance tools are used for switching on and off, it seems possible that door monitoring could be turned off during maintenance/ trouble shooting as well.

PREVENTIVE ACTION

Specific – Check all elevators equipped with Ascension 2000 controllers that your company maintains or inspects to ensure that the door monitoring circuits are functioning properly. Report the details (e.g. device location and provincial I.D. number) of any instances where the above defect is found to AEDARSA.

General – Elevator maintenance contractors should caution maintenance personnel and adjusters to the effect that when they conduct tests or use maintenance/diagnostic tools on solid state controls to ensure that all safety circuits, devices, systems function as originally intended after such procedures are completed.

Note: Door Monitoring – B44-94 Cl. 2.12.1.5(a); Redundancy – Cl. 2.12.1.5(b)

December 5, 2002 ADVISOR Vertical Enclosed Lifts Door Locks and Contacts

Re: The Safety of Persons could be compromised if Landing Door/Gate Interlocks and Locks and contacts don’t function properly

To: All Owners of Vertical Enclosed Lifts for Persons with Physical Disabilities

Background

We were recently advised of an incident in another jurisdiction involving a vertical enclosed type handicapped lift with a partial hoistway enclosure (walls and landing gate at least 1070 mm high all around) as permitted by code at the top landing.

While assisting an elderly person in a wheelchair, an attendant opened a landing gate on the top landing of a building and started to pull the chair backward into the lift. Unfortunately, the lift had left the upper landing with the gate at that landing closed but not locked. The assistant and the wheelchair with the elderly person fell down the lift hoistway. The person riding in the wheelchair received fatal injuries.

The lift involved was installed under the B355-M86 Safety Code for Elevating Devices for the Handicapped. The 1986 edition was the last edition that permitted landing doors or gates to be equipped with combination locks and contacts limited to where the maximum travel (upper landing sill to bottom landing sill) was 2500 mm.

SAFETY ISSUE

An investigation revealed that the combination lock and contact failed to lock the upper landing gate when the lift descended from the landing. Even though the upper gate was not in the locked position, the electrical contact made up and allowed the lift leave the upper landing.

PREVENTIVE ACTION

Owners – In Alberta, owners are required by the Safety Codes Act to maintain their lifts in safe operating condition at all times. Therefore, owners should ensure that qualified persons maintain their lifts and in particular, that landing doors and gates are checked frequently to ensure they are locked when the lift is not at the landing. If it is found that any landing door does not lock, secure the defective landing door and the lift against public access until the malfunction is properly repaired.

Lift Contractors – Check all landing doors or gates on vertical handicapped lifts that your company maintains, repairs or inspects to ensure they’re locked when the lift is not at the landing and Effect repairs immediately as necessary. Report the details (e.g. device location and provincial I.D. number) of any instances where such defects are found to AEDARSA.

Accredited Agencies – The Proper adjustment and function of landing door interlocks and combination locks and contacts are among the important items to be included in yearly inspections.

If any landing door interlock or combination lock and contact fails to function properly to lock landing doors/gates when a lift is not at the landing, ensure that the defective landing door and the lift is secured against public access until the malfunction is properly repaired.

December 4, 2002 ADVISOR

Re: Pending Adoption of CSA-B44-00 Safety Code For Elevators Elevator Hoistway/Building Designs for the Near Future

To: Building Design Architects and Elevator Contractors in Alberta

Our files: 5739-1-1

BACKGROUND

We expect that the new B44-00 code will be declared in force in Alberta by around April of 2003. A new requirement has been introduced in this code that may impact on building designs.

Clauses 2.14 and 3.1 of the code require standard railings (minimum 1070 mm / 42 in. high) to be installed on all sides of all elevator car tops where the distances between the edges of the car top and the adjacent hoistway enclosure exceeds 300 mm (12 in.). This new requirement is mainly in the interest of elevator worker safety.

POSSIBLE IMPACT ON FUTURE BUILDING DESIGNS

Building designers should consider that for buildings where elevators my be purchased in the near future, hoistways for elevators sold after the code is declared in force may have to be designed with higher ceilings than before to accommodate the above mentioned railings. In some cases overall building height may also be affected.

The new requirement will probably mostly affect building designs that incorporate hydraulic elevators since building roof structures are used for hoistway ceilings for most hydraulic elevators. However, building designs incorporating traction elevators may also be effected.

Note: Other overhead clearance requirements for elevators basically have not changed from the previous (1994) edition of code. They do however vary depending on the rated speed of elevators and if they’re equipped with electric or hydraulic drives and if they are equipped with counterweights.

SUGGESTED ACTION

Building designers should work closely with elevator suppliers/installers early in building design stages to ensure this new requirement is properly addressed.

March 19, 2002 NOTICE Reporting Accidents

Re: Pending Adoption of CSA-B44-00 Safety Code For Elevators Elevator Hoistway/Building Designs for the Near Future

To: Building Design Architects and Elevator Contractors in Alberta

This is a reminder to owners and/or their agents that under THE SAFETY CODES ACT must report accidents involving their elevating devices, passenger ropeways and amusement rides that results in death or serious injury to a person or damage to equipment.

The goal of this notice is to promote reporting of accidents in a more timely and consistent manner and to assist us in our effort to identify accident causes and prevent recurrences. To that end we request that owners/agents report all fatal, serious and serious equipment damage accidents immediately (by telephone). See below for further instructions/clarifications.

IMPORTANT NOTES

  1. Reports by phone may be made to any AEDARSA office. After hours emergency service is available.
  2. When a fatal or serious injury accident occurs, the equipment and the accident scene should be secured (no evidence moved or disturbed) from any access except that which is necessary for the immediate medical needs of injured persons or to prevent possible injuries to others. Otherwise, clearance must be obtained from the Safety Codes Officer receiving the immediate report before releasing the equipment and the accident scene.
  3. It is historically proven that minor injuries and even near misses can be a result of serious equipment problems. We therefore request that owners also report “Minor” injury accidents (see interpretations) for evaluation by AEDARSA with a view to further investigation as may be necessary.
  4. When a company is contracted to perform maintenance functions on behalf of the owner, as is common practice in the elevator industry, the maintenance contractor becomes an agent of the owner with respect to the equipment they maintain. As such, they also bear a responsibility to report accidents involving equipment they maintain.
  5. Following the report by telephone, a written report (AEDARSA report forms available) is to be forwarded by fax or mail as early as possible.

INTERPRETATIONS

Accident – An occurrence which as a result of a persons use of or contact with an elevating device or amusement ride or passenger ropeway results in death or injury; and
- A malfunction or failure of equipment that results in serious equipment damage or that could have resulted in an injury or both

ACCIDENT CATEGORIES

Fatal – Where an accident results in the death of a human being.

Serious – Where an accident has resulted in bodily injury such that injured person(s) require medical treatment or hospitalization. Where it is apparent that future complications to injured person(s) may arise, as a result of the accident, the accident should be considered serious.

Minor – Where an accident results in bodily injury that requires minor medical attention.

Serious Equipment Damage – Where an elevating device or amusement ride or passenger ropeway is damaged to the extent that significant repairs are required to restore the equipment to design specifications and/or to fully comply with applicable safety standards.

October 5, 1999 ADVISOR

Re: Dover Elevator Controllers – Model DMC-1 System to Monitor and Prevent Automatic Operation of the Elevator with Faulty Door Control Circuits CAN/CSA B44-94 Safety Code for Elevators, Clause 3.12.1.5

To: AEDARSA Elevator Safety Codes Officers

We have recently become aware of a feature of Dover Elevator Controllers Model DMC-1 that can confuse elevator technicians when connecting field wires in controllers during construction or making repairs or replacements. If field wiring (door contact/control circuits) is connected to the “XI 1″ terminal on the incorrect terminal block, the system for protection against faulty door contact circuits required by B44-94 Clause 3.12.1.5. is BYPASSED.

Dover supplies 2 terminal studs labeled “XI 1″ located on two different terminal blocks. The terminal blocks and the two “XI 1″ studs serve different functions.

Correct Field Wiring Connection

Field wiring must be connected to terminal stud “XI 1″[T22-5]. (on Terminal Block 22; Pin 5).

Wrong Field Wiring Connection

If the field wires are connected to terminal stud “XI 1″[T15 - 2] (on Terminal Block 15; Pin 2) the system for protection against faulty door contact circuits will be bypassed.

CHECK THE LOCATION OF FIELD WIRING AND ENSURE THE DOOR CONTACT MONITORING SYSTEM FUNCTIONS AS PER CODE REQUIREMENTS.

June 1999 ADVISOR

Re: Overview of Alberta’s New Maintenance Requirements For Elevators, Dumbwaiters, and Freight Platform Lifts under Alberta Regulation 216/97

An Alberta certified journeyman elevator constructor must perform maintenance, repairs, and replacements or directly supervise a registered apprentice doing the work. Under the new Alberta law, minimum required maintenance include:

  1. Inspect, examine, and test all parts and functions at required or scheduled intervals to ensure safe operating condition;
  2. Clean, lubricate, and adjust applicable components at regular intervals – repair or replace defective, worn, damaged or broken components as necessary to prevent the device from becoming unsafe for operation;
  3. Immediately adjust, repair, or replace defective parts directly affecting safe operation.

A logbook for each device must be kept on site or available at all time (record of all activities referred to this regulation and trouble calls for the last 5 years).

Up-to-date wiring diagrams are required in machine rooms (electrical protective devices and primary directional circuits).

A professional engineer (copy of certification recorded in logbooks) must certify changes in design of any components that might affect safe operation.

3 MONTH PROCEDURES

Examinations required for aforementioned criteria for functional compliance with applicable standards.

NOTE: A variance issued by Alberta Labour (Standata ED-99-001) provides for extensions to 12 months maximum by the original manufacturer, a professional engineer, or an elevator maintenance contractor provided the owner is notified and a written copy regarding details of variances are placed in the log book.

Examine and hand test overspeed safeties. If hand testing indicated potential malfunction, test safeties. Include governor pull through force test if excessive pull through or damage to governor rope.

Examine gland packing of valves and cylinders of hydraulic drive machines for excessive leaks and hydraulic fluid level in drive machine. Record amounts added and date in logbook.

Examine hydraulic fluid level in hydraulic buffers.

Examine suspension and overspeed governor wire ropes for excessive wear and broken wires (must meet elevator code criteria for replacement).

Examine all landing and car door mechanical and electrical components including:

  • interlocks, locks, contacts
  • door reopening devices
  • vision panels
  • hoistway access switches
  • eccentrics and retainers
  • door gibs
  • pickup rollers and assemblies
  • clutch/retiring cams and assemblies
  • hangers
  • hangers/door panel interconnecting means
  • door closers
  • closing force
  • restrictions on opening of car doors
  • door panels and sight guards

Dismantle and clean driving machine brakes, examine all components and test to ensure car will decelerate from rated speed when power removed from driving machine. Examine brake linings or any other component or any change affecting the operation or adjustment of the brake.

Test hydraulic driving machine relief valve setting and reseal if the control valve mechanism is altered or the seal is broken.

Examine exposed hydraulic cylinders visually and for cylinders that are not exposed, test for leaks.

Examine all parts relating to free-fall, overspeed, and uncontrolled low speed protection devices as per manufacturer’s recommendation and test for functioning (full-load tests not required).

PROCEDURE REQUIRED AT INTERVALS OTHER THAN EVERY THREE MONTHS

Perform plunger return test on oil buffers every 5 years.

Re-socket, replace or move hoist rope sockets of elevators and dumbwaiters with winding drum drives every 12 months for overhead machines and 2 years for machines below or at the side of the hoistway.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

April 1999 ADVISOR

What’s New in 1999 For Elevating Device Owners

Alberta Regulation 216/97 – Makes Maintenance Mandatory for Elevators, Escalators, Speed Walks, Speed Ramps, Dumbwaiters, Freight Platform Lifts.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Owners (or their agents) should make appropriate arrangements as soon as possible (if they have not already done so) in preparation for an expansion of in-service inspections to address the new maintenance requirements including:

  1. Maintenance and repairs must be performed by persons with an Alberta Certificate of Proficiency in the Trade of Elevator Constructor or by a registered apprentice under their direct supervision.
  2. Logbooks must be kept in each machine room (if no machine room available a sign posted at the driving machine indicating where); or electronic logbooks may be kept but must be available on demand for each device. Logbooks must contain records for 5 years of maintenance procedures conducted and trouble calls.

    NOTE: We suggest the date each procedure or service is carried out and the name of the elevator service person that performs each service be included in the logbook.

    NOTE: Since the keeping of logbooks is a new requirement it seems logical that logbooks be kept starting from May 1, 1999 as a minimum acceptable standard.

  3. Up-to-date electrical schematics must be maintained on sight.NOTE: If not now available, we suggest obtaining them through elevating device manufacturers, maintainers or consultants.
  4. General Maintenance including:

    1. Inspections, examinations and tests at required or scheduled intervals of all parts and functions of an installation in order to ensure, to a reasonable degree, that the installation is in a safe operating condition;
    2. Cleaning, lubricating and adjusting applicable components at regular intervals and repairing or replacing all worn or defective components where necessary, to prevent the device from becoming unsafe for operation;
    3. Repairing or replacing damaged or broken parts affecting safe operation.

The new regulation was supposed to go into effect in November 1998. However, since it’s adoption in 1997 considerable effort has been made to clarify with the legislators how intervals between specific maintenance procedures in the regulation are supposed to be applied. The way the regulation was struck, most of them are required every three months. To the best of our knowledge this did not accurately reflect the intent of the Safety Codes Council.

At present it appears a province wide ruling is imminent to facilitate that intent. When finalized, the variance should allow elevator manufacturers, maintenance contractors or engineers to vary the intervals up to at least yearly except where longer intervals are specified by the regulation subject to written proof of agreement by owners (or their agents).

We expect Alberta Labour in conjunction with the Safety Codes Council will issue the definitive document in the very near future. As soon as it is issued, application of the new regulation will commence.

SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR ELEVATORS

Alberta Regulation 276/98 is in effect on March 1, 1999

The regulation makes “door restrictors” mandatory on car doors of new elevators and allows them to be installed on existing elevators. It is intended to minimize the possibility of passengers falling down elevator shafts while jumping out of elevators stalled between floors. In effect, elevator car doors will no longer be openable from inside by trapped passengers unless they are within 250 mm (10 inches) of a landing.

As an option, longer platform guards may be used, subject to a maximum 250 mm opening exposed below regardless where the elevator stops. Its feasibility also depends on sufficient elevator pit depth. (Consult an elevator contractor for suitability in your application).

AEDARSA strongly recommends that elevator car door restrictors or alternate long platform guards (where feasible) be installed on all existing elevators.

Accident experience throughout North America supports it. The most recent we are aware of in Alberta was a fatality in late 1996. A youth jumped from an elevator stalled between floors; landed on the building floor below; stumbled and fell down the elevator shaft beneath the elevator through the hoistway door that had been opened from inside the elevator by the passengers that had been stuck.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

March 1999 ADVISOR

OTIS ESCALATORS – MODELS 506&510 – NON REVERSING DEVICE (FRD) SWITCH

To: Elevator Contractors & Inspection Agencies

Non-reversing devices are an important safety feature. They are intended to minimize potential injuries to passengers that might result from unintended reversal of escalators while riding in the up direction. As an example, this could occur due to loss of a phase in the power supply to a 3-phase drive motor. Their function is to ensure that the escalator brake is applied in such cases.

When performing maintenance tasks on Otis escalator models 506 and 510, the FRD switch should be checked regularly for wear on the end of the nylon arm that actuates the switch. On a number of these escalators we have found that the end of the nylon arm, which rides on the motor shaft mounted circular actuating plate, has worn to a point (originally blunt) causing it to “float over” the notch in the circular actuating plate rather than dropping in to the notch and actuating the switch to remove power from the driving machine and brake.

This is a relatively easy check. Observe the FRD switch and actuating arm while running the unit in both the up and down directions. Confirm that the switch arm actually drops into the notch on the circular actuating plate and reverses it’s direction. If it does not, replace the switch arm to restore the blunt end and maintain manufacturer’s switch arm end to bottom of notch clearance specifications.

Also, when checking the operation of the FRD circuit, another check should be made to ensure that the switch activates immediately. Another problem we have found relates to a timer in the FRD circuit that delays its actuation. If you find there is a delay, check if this meets up-to-date manufacturer’s specifications.

HOLLISTER WHITNEY “ROPE GRIPPERS”

During recent tests of a Hollister Whitney rope gripper, the rope gripper was actuated and functioned as required. However, during the process of resetting it, the side of the hydraulic cylinder ruptured. The unit could not be reset. On further investigation, we found a document headed “trouble shooting suggestions” among Hollister Whitney’s instructions about their experience with this problem. It includes possible causes and suggested corrective actions (see Attachment 2 for your information and action as necessary).

NEW REQUIREMENTS – ELEVATOR CAR DOOR RESTRICTORS – ALBERTA REGULATION (A.R.) 276/98

It is our understanding that copies of regulation 276/98 were provided to all elevator contractors by Alberta Labour.

On contracts signed on or after March 1, 1999 for new installations and some major alterations (where applicable per Section 10 of B44-94 Safety Code for Elevators), passenger elevators must be equipped so that the car doors cannot be opened more than 102 mm [approx. 4 inches] by passengers from inside the car while the car is outside the landing zone (250 mm [approx. 9.75 inches] above or below a landing).

NOTE: For purposes of this regulation, “landing zone” has been re-defined as follows: Landing zone – a zone extending from a point 250 mm below a landing to a point 250 mm above the landing.

As an alternate, long platform aprons (toe guards) may be used. However, they must be installed so that the hoistway opening space below the platform guard is limited to not more than 250 mm between the floor and the bottom of the platform guard, regardless of the elevator car when it is stopped.

WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT DOOR RESTRICTORS (AS NOW PERMITTED BY THE NEW REGULATION) BE ADDED TO ALL OLDER PASSENGER ELEVATORS.

ALBERTA REGULATION 216/97, Cl. 8.6.19 – ESCALATOR INSPECTION AND SERVICE SWITCH

We have had some proposals to accept pendant cord type inspection and service operating means as an equivalency. Clause 8.6.19 reads as follows: an inspection and service switch shall be provided in each machinery space of every new or existing escalator where a means of access to the space is provided that, when actuated, will open self-holding circuits of the driving machine motor and brake running relays. The switch shall be:

  1. permanently fastened to the machinery space in a location where it is readily accessible at the point of access to the space,
  2. of the manually opened and closed type,
  3. conspicuously and permanently marked to identify the “inspection” and “run” positions, and
  4. positively opened mechanically and the opening must not be solely dependent on springs.

Further to the above, Alberta Labour Bulletin Number ED-98-001 – ESC dated October, 1998 clarifies with the following:

Inspection switches shall be provided at escalator machinery spaces at the top and bottom landing of every new and existing escalator; and

Inspection switches shall be of the push pull type. The pushing in of the switch shall transfer the escalator to the inspection mode or the switch shall be of a type that is protected against accidental contact.

Pendant cord type inspection and service operating means that we have encountered so far seem to meet the main intent of clause 8.6.19 from standpoint of operating controls. However, other parts of the regulation and Albert Labour bulletin ED-98-001 need to be addressed for equivalency purposes. Examples of equivalencies possible and acceptable equivalents are as follows:

  1. Required – Inspection switches to be permanently fastened to the machinery space in a location where it is readily accessible at the point of access to the space.
    Equivalent for A – Provide pendant cords for each escalator in each facility. Store them permanently on site in a readily accessible, known location. Each pendant cord must be permanently marked indicating the make and/or model of escalator for which it is designed.
  2. Required – Inspection switches to be of the manually opened and closed type; and
  3. Required – Inspection switches to be positively opened mechanically and the opening must not be solely dependent on springs; and
  4. Required – Inspection switches to be of the push pull type. The pushing in of the switch shall transfer the escalator to the inspection mode or the switch shall be of a type that is protected against accidental contact.
    Equivalent for B, C,&D – When the pendant cord is manually plugged into it’s receptacle, the escalator only operates from pendant cord operating buttons and only while an up or down button is actuated. When pendant cord is removed from it’s receptacle escalator cannot be operated by any means unless a plug designed specifically for the purpose enabling automatic operation through the receptacle (without pendant cord and inspection operation buttons) must be manually plugged into the receptacle.
  5. Required – Inspection switches shall be provided at escalator machinery spaces at the top and bottom landing of every new and existing escalator.
    Equivalent for E – A receptacle for the pendant cord operating station is to be provided at escalator machinery spaces at the top and bottom landing.

ALBERTA REGULATION 216/97, SECTION 12 – MAINTENANCE OF ELEVATORS, DUMBWAITERS AND ESCALATORS

As you are probably aware, Alberta’s Section 12 was adopted in November 1997. Clause 12.2.2 in the regulation states – On and after November 1, 1998, except for procedures in this Section where time intervals are specified,maintenance inspections shall be carried out at least once every 3 months to ensure compliance with Clause 12.2.1. When adopted, this became the law. In effect, specific procedures set out in the regulation would have to be performed every three months (as underlined above). This did not reflect the intent of the ELEVATORS TECHNICAL COUNCIL. Their intent was that specified procedures be carried out at least once a year unless longer intervals are specified in the regulation.

When we questioned this, we were instructed not to enforce it pending further instructions. Alberta Labour in conjunction with the elevators technical council decided to try to find a way to rectify the problem other than change the regulation (potentially too long to process). We have been working with them on resolving this issue with them over the past months.

As a result, you should be receiving a STANDATA from Alberta Labour in the near future. The STANDATA should effect a province wide variance that will permit the intervals for procedures to be extended by elevator manufacturers, elevator maintenance companies or professional engineers up to one year provided the extension is documented in the log book for the device and signed by both the owner (or the owners agent) the elevator manufacturer, elevator maintenance company or professional engineer making the extension.

Once the STANDATA is issued we will implement measures for compliance.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

Otis_frd

Hollister Whitney

Troubleshooting Suggestions

Quoted from Hollister Whitney “Rope Gripper” Bulleting

Hollister Whitney has encountered, in a few instances, problems with the Hydraulic Cylinder rupturing during the operation of the “ROPE GRIPPER”. We have found that the reason for most of these problems is a result of:

  1. Air in the hydraulic Line.
  2. Micro-Solenoid locking unit out of adjustment
  3. Moveable shoe assembly binding on guide pins. (on models #600, 605&610)

We offer the following suggestions should these problems be encountered:

AIR IN LINE

Bleed air by loosening hose at cylinder, then using hand pump, pump until oil comes out of hose at cylinder and no air is evident.

MICROSWITCH OUT OF ADJUSTMENT

Adjust microswitch to 1/32″ clearance between latch and trigger to prevent rotating shaft from bottoming out in cam.

BINDING MOVEABLE SHOE

On models #600, 605&610 “ROPE GRIPPER” we have available a Guide Angle to squarely guide the moveable shoe, preventing it from binding on the 4 guide pins.

October 29, 1998 ADVISOR

Escalator Inspection Switches

For Managers or Persons in Charge of Alberta Elevator Contracting Firms

In case you didn’t receive one directly from Alberta Labour, attached is a copy of Alberta Labour STANDATA Number ED-98-001-ESC regarding escalator inspection switches. I understand that Alberta Labour mailed it out to escalator owners on October 27, 1998.

In addition, this is to let you know about AEDARSA’s policies in this regard as follows:

  1. Escalators for which certificates of construction and alteration are issued after December 1, 1998 will have to comply with Clause 3(2)(a) of Alberta Regulation 216/97per Alberta Labour STANDATA ED-98-001-ESC.

    As part of acceptance inspections on those escalators that fall within the above parameters, AEDARSA inspectors will be issuing directives as necessary for compliance.

  2. Commencing immediately as part of those in-service inspections of escalators that AEDARSA inspectors perform, they will be issuing directives as needed to gain compliance and providing a copy of Alberta Labour STANDATA ED-98-001-ESC to affected owners along with their copy of the inspectors report.

    To provide a reasonable amount of time for owners to arrange for compliance with these directives, completion dates will be the date that the next annual inspection is due (e.g. June 30th, September 30th, December 31st or March 31st of the following year).

  3. We anticipate that some variances may be requested. Bearing in mind those variance requests must demonstrate equivalent or greater safety compared to exactly meeting requirements, variance applications must give rationale-supporting claims of equivalency. Written applications may be forwarded to either of our offices in Edmonton or Calgary.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

April 1998 ADVISOR

Hydraulic Elevators – Buried Cylinders

We sincerely hope that this first issue of the ADVISOR provides our clients with information they find useful about elevating devices and their safety. We wish to provide safety and be helpful to our clients in this regard.

Recently we’ve received a number of inquiries from owners concerned with potential catastrophic failures (bottom blowouts) of buried hydraulic cylinders, particularly older elevators fitted with single bulkheads at the bottom (double bulkheads required by code after 1982). An affected elevator could free fall to the hoistway bottom.

Once installed in the ground, there seems no practical way to determine for certain whether or not cylinders are so fitted. However, while double bulkheads may provide better protection than single bulkheads, in our opinion they do not guarantee protection against catastrophic failure.

Hence, the newest national elevator code (adopted in Alberta) requires sealed PVC jackets surrounding buried hydraulic cylinders with an air space around cylinders on new installations. This applies to replacement cylinders.

While we are aware of no reported cases in Alberta of catastrophic failure, we understand several have occurred in the U.S. and at least one in eastern Canada. So it cannot be denied that the possibility exists here. We would suggest some things could be done to minimize the chance of catastrophic failures of existing cylinders.

First confirm if the hydraulic cylinder is leaking underground. They can be tested (per elevator code procedure) to detect underground leaks. Elevator contractors should perform this work. If a cylinder is proven to leak, then it must be replaced.

For cylinders proven not to be leaking, early detection of leaks can be achieved through frequent regular monitoring and recording of hydraulic oil losses (identified by having to add oil to the system) and the reasons for adding oil. As soon as oil losses cannot be explained (e.g. leaks above ground) then the leak must be below ground. Then the cylinder must be replaced. Elevator contractors should provide this monitoring.

NOTE: Leaks can also occur in buried piping (where equipped) between hydraulic drive pumps and cylinders.

NOTE: For additional protection, down over speed protection devices, offered by some elevator contractors, could be installed. AEDARSA will issue variances that may be required for such devices, provided safety in other affected areas is not compromised. This is not to be considered a substitute for replacing leaking cylinders.

Considering A Modernization?

Most elevators and escalators in Alberta were installed before or during the boom that ended in the early 80′s and are aging. The trend toward modernization seems to be increasing.

When modernizing we suggest owners and their agents can avoid increasing their liability exposure (and unnecessary costs of corrections) that can occur through conflicts with safety codes adopted as law in Alberta.

We suggest using reputable elevator contractors and include wording to reflect “all work and equipment must comply with applicable Alberta codes and regulations” in job tender specifications.

Modernization almost always involves major or minor alterations to the equipment. Under Alberta regulations major alterations are subject to an approval process by AEDARSA. The duty rests with owners and contractors to adhere with regulations and adopted safety codes involved when minor alterations are carried out.

One of the most common minor modernizations is to passenger elevators by refinishing interiors of elevator car cabs. This can be subject to adopted codes and regulations. Some of the most commonly overlooked include:

  • specified flame spread and smoke developed characteristics
  • specified safety glass/plastic types for mirrors and enclosures
  • rules limiting elevator car weight increases before load bearing components and counterbalancing (where used) must be evaluated for their ability to handle increased loads
  • rules governing light levels and fixture protection
  • rules governing car top emergency exits and access to them
  • rules governing car cab ventilation

When adding all or some special emergency service (formerly fire-fighters control) features to elevators:

  • numerous and complex safety code rules become applicable to the various elements of such systems when they are installed

Where relay logic control systems are replaced with solid state systems. While a major alteration, in some cases these have been done without following the approval process.

When discovered after the fact, formal acceptance and inspection and tests needed to confirm that equipment is installed as designed and that safety devices and switches and speed control systems function as per code requirements can be both costly and highly inconvenient for everyone involved.

Escalator Safety Enhancement

Sometimes passengers get their feet caught between the steps and side (skirt) panels of escalators. This has resulted in minor cuts and abrasions and occasionally somewhat more serious injuries.

Serious injuries are supposed to be reported to AEDARSA for investigation with a view to preventing recurrences.

The nature of escalators is such that, while restricted to close tolerances by the code, clearance space in this area has not been eliminated. Clearance is needed to minimize wear and noise.

In addition to regular checks and skirt panel adjustments by qualified tradesmen to keep clearances at allowed tolerances, some add-on features might be considered as options to reduce this hazard on older units such as:

  • refinishing escalator skirt panels with low friction surfaces, or alternatively, frequent application of friction reducing agents
  • demarcation markings on step sides and fronts
  • protruding brushes designed for the purpose are available and can be added at side panels that tend to persuade people to keep their feet away from the sides
  • raised plastic type strips on outermost step cleats at both sides with special combplates designed for the purpose are available The raised strips are intended to make it uncomfortable to stand with their feet against the sides.

To avoid introducing other hazards when making changes, always employ elevator professionals and tradesmen

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

April 18, 1998 ADVISOR

Dover Elevators GD45 Machine Gear Mounting Bolt Failure (Newfoundland Elevator Incident)

To: Maintenance Contractors/Accredited Agencies
Number: 97-100

Problem

Dover GD45 machines, the bolt heads of the six 5/8″ mounting bolts broke below the head, allowing the bolts to work out of the mounting holes of the gear and the spider. This condition allowed the gear to lose solid connection with the spider and cause loss of control between the drive sheave and the worm shaft. (Dover Drawing Number: 501294 attached)

Action

  1. (A.S.A.P.) Please check all GD45 machines and look for loose/broken or missing bolts that connect the gear to the spider. (Remove cover plate and try tightening bolt)
  2. If any broken bolts are located, the device is to be “removed from service” and AEDARSA is to be contacted (sample of damaged bolts required) for further action.
  3. Complete one safety bulletin form per building inspected. Please forward this information to AEDARSA.
  4. If you know of any devices of this type that may not have a maintenance contract, please contact our office so that the owners may have the required inspection carried out.

Device ID Numbers

Building Name

Building Address

Agent/Owner

Inspection Procedure

Inspection Results

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

To Owners of Single Bottom Cylinder(July 2016)

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Major and Minor Alterations Guidelines

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NOTICE – Elevating Devices Codes Regulation AR 192/2015

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February 1, 2011 ADVISOR

Re: General Elevator Corporation Aluminum Cylinder Head Issue

Vintage: From 1974 to 1982 (approximately)

To: All Industry Elevator Companies and Elevator Safety Bureau

General Elevator Sales and Service, Inc. (“GESS”) recently discovered a failure in the Aluminum Cylinder Head which had been manufactured by General Elevator Corporation. The failure was discovered in a hydraulic pressure test where the packing box housing separated from the housing. GESS was not the manufacturer or installer of the product and is not related to General Elevator Corporation who is believed to have manufactured and installed the Aluminum Cylinder Heads during the period of approximately 1974 through 1982. GESS is not aware of the cause of the failure, but is providing this notice to the Industry so that elevator companies may inspect the Aluminum Cylinder Heads manufactured by General Elevator Corporation to make sure they are not damaged and/or determine whether the heads should be replaced with steel cylinder heads.

ED_SafetyAdvisor_ElevatorSafetyAlert20110201

June 24, 2009 ADVISOR

Elevator Oil Line Shut-off Valve

Hydraulic Supply Line Shut-off Valves installed in the 1970's

Due to a recent accident involving a hydraulic elevator shut-off valve, ThyssenKrupp Elevator Americas Business Unit investigated and discovered similar shut-off valves on units we maintain in the United States. These valves were not distributed by our factory, but may have been a locally sourced item when AHJ's required an additional shut-off valve be installed in the system.

ThyssenKrupp Elevator Canada Ltd. is not aware of the use of this valve on out equipment or other existing elevator equipment we maintain. As a precaution we have distributed the attached safety alert to our maintenance personnel. They need to be aware of the potential issues and report any similar shut-off valves they may encounter to their supervisor, so we can approach the owners to arrange replacement.

Please feel free to use this information as you see fit, and contact us if you require additional information regarding the enclosed.

Background: In the 1970's line shutoff valves similar to the one pictured below were used during some elevator installations and/or replacements. To the best of our knowledge, these valves were purchased locally and were not manufactured by an elevator company. These valves were approved and accepted for elevator use by the AHJs back at that time. However, a recent accident involving an elevator mechanic with an independent company clearly indicates that our field personnel need to be familiar with how this valve operates, and the risks presented if it is not properly opened or closed.

ED_SafetyAdvisor_ElevatorShutOffValve

Issue: There are two potential safety issues with this valve. First, there is a nut on the bottom of the valve that must first be loosened and then the shaft tapped up to loosen the internal valve body before closing. After this is done, the elevator personnel can then turn the top to close the valve. At that point the nut must be tightened again to hold the closed position. Going through the preliminary steps of loosening and then tapping the valve to unseat the internal body is not required on all valves. Thus we must make sure that all of our field personnel our familiar with the requirements of this type of valve. Simply putting a wrench to the valve in an attempt to close it can cause the valve to break and the complete loss of pressure.

Second, the threads on the shaft are composed of a relatively soft metal, so over time the threads on this valve can strip due to wear and tear. When this occurs the integrity of the threaded piece may become compromised.

To address the risks associated with this type of valve, many installers put a U-bolt clamp around the valve (pictured) to stiffen it and prevent the valve from being closed improperly.

The recent tragic accident involving one of these valves indicates that we need to advise all of our field personnel about the risks posed by these valves if they are not operated properly, and also advise them of the steps required before even working on such a valve.

Action: TKE employees should under no circumstances work on this type of valve without the elevator being secured on landing blocks or suspended, and the oil line being relieved of pressure. This includes removal of the U-bolt clamp. No U-bolt clamp should be removed without landing or suspending the car.

A copy of this Safety Alert should be affixed right to any valve of this design maintained by ThyssenKrupp Elevator. Please put this alert in plastic sleeve, and attach it to the pit valve.

Safety Advisor Elevator Shut-Off Valve Safety Alert

July 17, 2006 ADVISOR

Re: Manual Reset Procedure for the Hollister Whitney Rope Gripper

From: Hollister Whitney Elevator Corp.

To: Manufacturers of Elevator Controls

ISSUE: ASME / B44 Requirements 2.19.1.2 (a) (4) and 2.19.2.2 (a) (4), require that if the Rope Gripper is triggered because of a fault, it must be manually reset. Hollister Whitney assumes that these requirements are in place so that a qualified technician assesses and corrects the fault before the car is placed back into service.

POTENTIAL PROBLEM: If a technician does not correct the fault before the car is returned to service (Rope Gripper is reset), it is possible that the car can begin to move. If the fault was caused by a brake failure, it is possible that the car could reach high speeds, and/or fall into the pit or overhead before it is stopped.

RECOMMENDATION: Elevator control manufacturers should understand this situation and make sure that in their Rope Gripper reset procedure there is a provision to give the technician control over the potential for a car to fall up or down when the Rope Gripper is manually released (reset).

One solution might be to have a maintained pressure button for Rope Gripper reset. Release of this button prior to some short preset period of time would then reapply the Rope Gripper

If you have any questions about this bulletin, please call Hollister Whitney at 217-222-0466

December 5, 2002 ADVISOR US Elevator Ascension 2000 Controls

Re: US Elevator Ascension 2000 Hydraulic Elevator Controls Risks Associated with Testing/Trouble Shooting Solid State Controls

To: All Elevator Contractors and Accredited Agencies

Our files: 5703-1, 5751-1

BACKGROUND

We were recently advised that on an initial inspection of a hydraulic elevator with Ascension 2000 controls in another jurisdiction, an inspector found the door monitor circuit to be functioning properly when first tested. During subsequent redundancy tests, printed circuit boards of the control were damaged when jumpers were placed on the wrong terminals. After the damage was repaired, door monitoring was again tested and found not to be functioning.

SAFETY ISSUE

An investigation revealed that the door monitor circuit can be turned on and off. It seemed that when jumpers for testing redundancy were put on the wrong terminals the setting for the door monitor circuit was turned off. During an investigation it was discovered that the door monitor circuit can also be turned off with the maintenance tool.

ANALYSIS

Putting jumpers in the wrong control circuits might have caused the door monitoring to be turned off. However, while it may be expected that the feature is intentionally turned “off” for construction purposes to be turned “on” before the device is placed in service, the final step could be missed. Given this scenario, assuming maintenance tools are used for switching on and off, it seems possible that door monitoring could be turned off during maintenance/ trouble shooting as well.

PREVENTIVE ACTION

Specific - Check all elevators equipped with Ascension 2000 controllers that your company maintains or inspects to ensure that the door monitoring circuits are functioning properly. Report the details (e.g. device location and provincial I.D. number) of any instances where the above defect is found to AEDARSA.

General - Elevator maintenance contractors should caution maintenance personnel and adjusters to the effect that when they conduct tests or use maintenance/diagnostic tools on solid state controls to ensure that all safety circuits, devices, systems function as originally intended after such procedures are completed.

Note: Door Monitoring - B44-94 Cl. 2.12.1.5(a); Redundancy – Cl. 2.12.1.5(b)

December 5, 2002 ADVISOR Vertical Enclosed Lifts Door Locks and Contacts

Re: The Safety of Persons could be compromised if Landing Door/Gate Interlocks and Locks and contacts don't function properly

To: All Owners of Vertical Enclosed Lifts for Persons with Physical Disabilities

Background

We were recently advised of an incident in another jurisdiction involving a vertical enclosed type handicapped lift with a partial hoistway enclosure (walls and landing gate at least 1070 mm high all around) as permitted by code at the top landing.

While assisting an elderly person in a wheelchair, an attendant opened a landing gate on the top landing of a building and started to pull the chair backward into the lift. Unfortunately, the lift had left the upper landing with the gate at that landing closed but not locked. The assistant and the wheelchair with the elderly person fell down the lift hoistway. The person riding in the wheelchair received fatal injuries.

The lift involved was installed under the B355-M86 Safety Code for Elevating Devices for the Handicapped. The 1986 edition was the last edition that permitted landing doors or gates to be equipped with combination locks and contacts limited to where the maximum travel (upper landing sill to bottom landing sill) was 2500 mm.

SAFETY ISSUE

An investigation revealed that the combination lock and contact failed to lock the upper landing gate when the lift descended from the landing. Even though the upper gate was not in the locked position, the electrical contact made up and allowed the lift leave the upper landing.

PREVENTIVE ACTION

Owners - In Alberta, owners are required by the Safety Codes Act to maintain their lifts in safe operating condition at all times. Therefore, owners should ensure that qualified persons maintain their lifts and in particular, that landing doors and gates are checked frequently to ensure they are locked when the lift is not at the landing. If it is found that any landing door does not lock, secure the defective landing door and the lift against public access until the malfunction is properly repaired.

Lift Contractors - Check all landing doors or gates on vertical handicapped lifts that your company maintains, repairs or inspects to ensure they’re locked when the lift is not at the landing and Effect repairs immediately as necessary. Report the details (e.g. device location and provincial I.D. number) of any instances where such defects are found to AEDARSA.

Accredited Agencies - The Proper adjustment and function of landing door interlocks and combination locks and contacts are among the important items to be included in yearly inspections.

If any landing door interlock or combination lock and contact fails to function properly to lock landing doors/gates when a lift is not at the landing, ensure that the defective landing door and the lift is secured against public access until the malfunction is properly repaired.

December 4, 2002 ADVISOR

Re: Pending Adoption of CSA-B44-00 Safety Code For Elevators Elevator Hoistway/Building Designs for the Near Future

To: Building Design Architects and Elevator Contractors in Alberta

Our files: 5739-1-1

BACKGROUND

We expect that the new B44-00 code will be declared in force in Alberta by around April of 2003. A new requirement has been introduced in this code that may impact on building designs.

Clauses 2.14 and 3.1 of the code require standard railings (minimum 1070 mm / 42 in. high) to be installed on all sides of all elevator car tops where the distances between the edges of the car top and the adjacent hoistway enclosure exceeds 300 mm (12 in.). This new requirement is mainly in the interest of elevator worker safety.

POSSIBLE IMPACT ON FUTURE BUILDING DESIGNS

Building designers should consider that for buildings where elevators my be purchased in the near future, hoistways for elevators sold after the code is declared in force may have to be designed with higher ceilings than before to accommodate the above mentioned railings. In some cases overall building height may also be affected.

The new requirement will probably mostly affect building designs that incorporate hydraulic elevators since building roof structures are used for hoistway ceilings for most hydraulic elevators. However, building designs incorporating traction elevators may also be effected.

Note: Other overhead clearance requirements for elevators basically have not changed from the previous (1994) edition of code. They do however vary depending on the rated speed of elevators and if they’re equipped with electric or hydraulic drives and if they are equipped with counterweights.

SUGGESTED ACTION

Building designers should work closely with elevator suppliers/installers early in building design stages to ensure this new requirement is properly addressed.

March 19, 2002 NOTICE Reporting Accidents

Re: Pending Adoption of CSA-B44-00 Safety Code For Elevators Elevator Hoistway/Building Designs for the Near Future

To: Building Design Architects and Elevator Contractors in Alberta

This is a reminder to owners and/or their agents that under THE SAFETY CODES ACT must report accidents involving their elevating devices, passenger ropeways and amusement rides that results in death or serious injury to a person or damage to equipment.

The goal of this notice is to promote reporting of accidents in a more timely and consistent manner and to assist us in our effort to identify accident causes and prevent recurrences. To that end we request that owners/agents report all fatal, serious and serious equipment damage accidents immediately (by telephone). See below for further instructions/clarifications.

IMPORTANT NOTES

  1. Reports by phone may be made to any AEDARSA office. After hours emergency service is available.
  2. When a fatal or serious injury accident occurs, the equipment and the accident scene should be secured (no evidence moved or disturbed) from any access except that which is necessary for the immediate medical needs of injured persons or to prevent possible injuries to others. Otherwise, clearance must be obtained from the Safety Codes Officer receiving the immediate report before releasing the equipment and the accident scene.
  3. It is historically proven that minor injuries and even near misses can be a result of serious equipment problems. We therefore request that owners also report “Minor” injury accidents (see interpretations) for evaluation by AEDARSA with a view to further investigation as may be necessary.
  4. When a company is contracted to perform maintenance functions on behalf of the owner, as is common practice in the elevator industry, the maintenance contractor becomes an agent of the owner with respect to the equipment they maintain. As such, they also bear a responsibility to report accidents involving equipment they maintain.
  5. Following the report by telephone, a written report (AEDARSA report forms available) is to be forwarded by fax or mail as early as possible.

INTERPRETATIONS

Accident - An occurrence which as a result of a persons use of or contact with an elevating device or amusement ride or passenger ropeway results in death or injury; and - A malfunction or failure of equipment that results in serious equipment damage or that could have resulted in an injury or both

ACCIDENT CATEGORIES

Fatal - Where an accident results in the death of a human being.

Serious - Where an accident has resulted in bodily injury such that injured person(s) require medical treatment or hospitalization. Where it is apparent that future complications to injured person(s) may arise, as a result of the accident, the accident should be considered serious.

Minor - Where an accident results in bodily injury that requires minor medical attention.

Serious Equipment Damage - Where an elevating device or amusement ride or passenger ropeway is damaged to the extent that significant repairs are required to restore the equipment to design specifications and/or to fully comply with applicable safety standards.

October 5, 1999 ADVISOR

Re: Dover Elevator Controllers - Model DMC-1 System to Monitor and Prevent Automatic Operation of the Elevator with Faulty Door Control Circuits CAN/CSA B44-94 Safety Code for Elevators, Clause 3.12.1.5

To: AEDARSA Elevator Safety Codes Officers

We have recently become aware of a feature of Dover Elevator Controllers Model DMC-1 that can confuse elevator technicians when connecting field wires in controllers during construction or making repairs or replacements. If field wiring (door contact/control circuits) is connected to the "XI 1" terminal on the incorrect terminal block, the system for protection against faulty door contact circuits required by B44-94 Clause 3.12.1.5. is BYPASSED.

Dover supplies 2 terminal studs labeled "XI 1" located on two different terminal blocks. The terminal blocks and the two "XI 1" studs serve different functions.

Correct Field Wiring Connection

Field wiring must be connected to terminal stud "XI 1"[T22-5]. (on Terminal Block 22; Pin 5).

Wrong Field Wiring Connection

If the field wires are connected to terminal stud "XI 1"[T15 - 2] (on Terminal Block 15; Pin 2) the system for protection against faulty door contact circuits will be bypassed.

CHECK THE LOCATION OF FIELD WIRING AND ENSURE THE DOOR CONTACT MONITORING SYSTEM FUNCTIONS AS PER CODE REQUIREMENTS.

June 1999 ADVISOR

Re: Overview of Alberta's New Maintenance Requirements For Elevators, Dumbwaiters, and Freight Platform Lifts under Alberta Regulation 216/97

An Alberta certified journeyman elevator constructor must perform maintenance, repairs, and replacements or directly supervise a registered apprentice doing the work. Under the new Alberta law, minimum required maintenance include:

  1. Inspect, examine, and test all parts and functions at required or scheduled intervals to ensure safe operating condition;
  2. Clean, lubricate, and adjust applicable components at regular intervals - repair or replace defective, worn, damaged or broken components as necessary to prevent the device from becoming unsafe for operation;
  3. Immediately adjust, repair, or replace defective parts directly affecting safe operation.

A logbook for each device must be kept on site or available at all time (record of all activities referred to this regulation and trouble calls for the last 5 years).

Up-to-date wiring diagrams are required in machine rooms (electrical protective devices and primary directional circuits).

A professional engineer (copy of certification recorded in logbooks) must certify changes in design of any components that might affect safe operation.

3 MONTH PROCEDURES

Examinations required for aforementioned criteria for functional compliance with applicable standards.

NOTE: A variance issued by Alberta Labour (Standata ED-99-001) provides for extensions to 12 months maximum by the original manufacturer, a professional engineer, or an elevator maintenance contractor provided the owner is notified and a written copy regarding details of variances are placed in the log book.

Examine and hand test overspeed safeties. If hand testing indicated potential malfunction, test safeties. Include governor pull through force test if excessive pull through or damage to governor rope.

Examine gland packing of valves and cylinders of hydraulic drive machines for excessive leaks and hydraulic fluid level in drive machine. Record amounts added and date in logbook.

Examine hydraulic fluid level in hydraulic buffers.

Examine suspension and overspeed governor wire ropes for excessive wear and broken wires (must meet elevator code criteria for replacement).

Examine all landing and car door mechanical and electrical components including:

  • interlocks, locks, contacts
  • door reopening devices
  • vision panels
  • hoistway access switches
  • eccentrics and retainers
  • door gibs
  • pickup rollers and assemblies
  • clutch/retiring cams and assemblies
  • hangers
  • hangers/door panel interconnecting means
  • door closers
  • closing force
  • restrictions on opening of car doors
  • door panels and sight guards

Dismantle and clean driving machine brakes, examine all components and test to ensure car will decelerate from rated speed when power removed from driving machine. Examine brake linings or any other component or any change affecting the operation or adjustment of the brake.

Test hydraulic driving machine relief valve setting and reseal if the control valve mechanism is altered or the seal is broken.

Examine exposed hydraulic cylinders visually and for cylinders that are not exposed, test for leaks.

Examine all parts relating to free-fall, overspeed, and uncontrolled low speed protection devices as per manufacturer's recommendation and test for functioning (full-load tests not required).

PROCEDURE REQUIRED AT INTERVALS OTHER THAN EVERY THREE MONTHS

Perform plunger return test on oil buffers every 5 years.

Re-socket, replace or move hoist rope sockets of elevators and dumbwaiters with winding drum drives every 12 months for overhead machines and 2 years for machines below or at the side of the hoistway.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

April 1999 ADVISOR

What's New in 1999 For Elevating Device Owners

Alberta Regulation 216/97 - Makes Maintenance Mandatory for Elevators, Escalators, Speed Walks, Speed Ramps, Dumbwaiters, Freight Platform Lifts.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Owners (or their agents) should make appropriate arrangements as soon as possible (if they have not already done so) in preparation for an expansion of in-service inspections to address the new maintenance requirements including:

  1. Maintenance and repairs must be performed by persons with an Alberta Certificate of Proficiency in the Trade of Elevator Constructor or by a registered apprentice under their direct supervision.
  2. Logbooks must be kept in each machine room (if no machine room available a sign posted at the driving machine indicating where); or electronic logbooks may be kept but must be available on demand for each device. Logbooks must contain records for 5 years of maintenance procedures conducted and trouble calls.

    NOTE: We suggest the date each procedure or service is carried out and the name of the elevator service person that performs each service be included in the logbook.

    NOTE: Since the keeping of logbooks is a new requirement it seems logical that logbooks be kept starting from May 1, 1999 as a minimum acceptable standard.

  3. Up-to-date electrical schematics must be maintained on sight.NOTE: If not now available, we suggest obtaining them through elevating device manufacturers, maintainers or consultants.
  4. General Maintenance including:
    1. Inspections, examinations and tests at required or scheduled intervals of all parts and functions of an installation in order to ensure, to a reasonable degree, that the installation is in a safe operating condition;
    2. Cleaning, lubricating and adjusting applicable components at regular intervals and repairing or replacing all worn or defective components where necessary, to prevent the device from becoming unsafe for operation;
    3. Repairing or replacing damaged or broken parts affecting safe operation.

The new regulation was supposed to go into effect in November 1998. However, since it's adoption in 1997 considerable effort has been made to clarify with the legislators how intervals between specific maintenance procedures in the regulation are supposed to be applied. The way the regulation was struck, most of them are required every three months. To the best of our knowledge this did not accurately reflect the intent of the Safety Codes Council.

At present it appears a province wide ruling is imminent to facilitate that intent. When finalized, the variance should allow elevator manufacturers, maintenance contractors or engineers to vary the intervals up to at least yearly except where longer intervals are specified by the regulation subject to written proof of agreement by owners (or their agents).

We expect Alberta Labour in conjunction with the Safety Codes Council will issue the definitive document in the very near future. As soon as it is issued, application of the new regulation will commence.

SAFETY IMPROVEMENTS FOR ELEVATORS

Alberta Regulation 276/98 is in effect on March 1, 1999

The regulation makes "door restrictors" mandatory on car doors of new elevators and allows them to be installed on existing elevators. It is intended to minimize the possibility of passengers falling down elevator shafts while jumping out of elevators stalled between floors. In effect, elevator car doors will no longer be openable from inside by trapped passengers unless they are within 250 mm (10 inches) of a landing.

As an option, longer platform guards may be used, subject to a maximum 250 mm opening exposed below regardless where the elevator stops. Its feasibility also depends on sufficient elevator pit depth. (Consult an elevator contractor for suitability in your application).

AEDARSA strongly recommends that elevator car door restrictors or alternate long platform guards (where feasible) be installed on all existing elevators.

Accident experience throughout North America supports it. The most recent we are aware of in Alberta was a fatality in late 1996. A youth jumped from an elevator stalled between floors; landed on the building floor below; stumbled and fell down the elevator shaft beneath the elevator through the hoistway door that had been opened from inside the elevator by the passengers that had been stuck.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

March 1999 ADVISOR

OTIS ESCALATORS - MODELS 506&510 - NON REVERSING DEVICE (FRD) SWITCH

To: Elevator Contractors & Inspection Agencies

Non-reversing devices are an important safety feature. They are intended to minimize potential injuries to passengers that might result from unintended reversal of escalators while riding in the up direction. As an example, this could occur due to loss of a phase in the power supply to a 3-phase drive motor. Their function is to ensure that the escalator brake is applied in such cases.

When performing maintenance tasks on Otis escalator models 506 and 510, the FRD switch should be checked regularly for wear on the end of the nylon arm that actuates the switch. On a number of these escalators we have found that the end of the nylon arm, which rides on the motor shaft mounted circular actuating plate, has worn to a point (originally blunt) causing it to "float over" the notch in the circular actuating plate rather than dropping in to the notch and actuating the switch to remove power from the driving machine and brake.

This is a relatively easy check. Observe the FRD switch and actuating arm while running the unit in both the up and down directions. Confirm that the switch arm actually drops into the notch on the circular actuating plate and reverses it's direction. If it does not, replace the switch arm to restore the blunt end and maintain manufacturer's switch arm end to bottom of notch clearance specifications.

Also, when checking the operation of the FRD circuit, another check should be made to ensure that the switch activates immediately. Another problem we have found relates to a timer in the FRD circuit that delays its actuation. If you find there is a delay, check if this meets up-to-date manufacturer's specifications.

HOLLISTER WHITNEY "ROPE GRIPPERS"

During recent tests of a Hollister Whitney rope gripper, the rope gripper was actuated and functioned as required. However, during the process of resetting it, the side of the hydraulic cylinder ruptured. The unit could not be reset. On further investigation, we found a document headed "trouble shooting suggestions" among Hollister Whitney's instructions about their experience with this problem. It includes possible causes and suggested corrective actions (see Attachment 2 for your information and action as necessary).

NEW REQUIREMENTS - ELEVATOR CAR DOOR RESTRICTORS - ALBERTA REGULATION (A.R.) 276/98

It is our understanding that copies of regulation 276/98 were provided to all elevator contractors by Alberta Labour.

On contracts signed on or after March 1, 1999 for new installations and some major alterations (where applicable per Section 10 of B44-94 Safety Code for Elevators), passenger elevators must be equipped so that the car doors cannot be opened more than 102 mm [approx. 4 inches] by passengers from inside the car while the car is outside the landing zone (250 mm [approx. 9.75 inches] above or below a landing).

NOTE: For purposes of this regulation, "landing zone" has been re-defined as follows: Landing zone - a zone extending from a point 250 mm below a landing to a point 250 mm above the landing.

As an alternate, long platform aprons (toe guards) may be used. However, they must be installed so that the hoistway opening space below the platform guard is limited to not more than 250 mm between the floor and the bottom of the platform guard, regardless of the elevator car when it is stopped.

WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THAT DOOR RESTRICTORS (AS NOW PERMITTED BY THE NEW REGULATION) BE ADDED TO ALL OLDER PASSENGER ELEVATORS.

ALBERTA REGULATION 216/97, Cl. 8.6.19 - ESCALATOR INSPECTION AND SERVICE SWITCH

We have had some proposals to accept pendant cord type inspection and service operating means as an equivalency. Clause 8.6.19 reads as follows: an inspection and service switch shall be provided in each machinery space of every new or existing escalator where a means of access to the space is provided that, when actuated, will open self-holding circuits of the driving machine motor and brake running relays. The switch shall be:

  1. permanently fastened to the machinery space in a location where it is readily accessible at the point of access to the space,
  2. of the manually opened and closed type,
  3. conspicuously and permanently marked to identify the "inspection" and "run" positions, and
  4. positively opened mechanically and the opening must not be solely dependent on springs.

Further to the above, Alberta Labour Bulletin Number ED-98-001 - ESC dated October, 1998 clarifies with the following:

Inspection switches shall be provided at escalator machinery spaces at the top and bottom landing of every new and existing escalator; and

Inspection switches shall be of the push pull type. The pushing in of the switch shall transfer the escalator to the inspection mode or the switch shall be of a type that is protected against accidental contact.

Pendant cord type inspection and service operating means that we have encountered so far seem to meet the main intent of clause 8.6.19 from standpoint of operating controls. However, other parts of the regulation and Albert Labour bulletin ED-98-001 need to be addressed for equivalency purposes. Examples of equivalencies possible and acceptable equivalents are as follows:

  1. Required - Inspection switches to be permanently fastened to the machinery space in a location where it is readily accessible at the point of access to the space. Equivalent for A - Provide pendant cords for each escalator in each facility. Store them permanently on site in a readily accessible, known location. Each pendant cord must be permanently marked indicating the make and/or model of escalator for which it is designed.
  2. Required - Inspection switches to be of the manually opened and closed type; and
  3. Required - Inspection switches to be positively opened mechanically and the opening must not be solely dependent on springs; and
  4. Required - Inspection switches to be of the push pull type. The pushing in of the switch shall transfer the escalator to the inspection mode or the switch shall be of a type that is protected against accidental contact. Equivalent for B, C,&D - When the pendant cord is manually plugged into it's receptacle, the escalator only operates from pendant cord operating buttons and only while an up or down button is actuated. When pendant cord is removed from it's receptacle escalator cannot be operated by any means unless a plug designed specifically for the purpose enabling automatic operation through the receptacle (without pendant cord and inspection operation buttons) must be manually plugged into the receptacle.
  5. Required - Inspection switches shall be provided at escalator machinery spaces at the top and bottom landing of every new and existing escalator. Equivalent for E - A receptacle for the pendant cord operating station is to be provided at escalator machinery spaces at the top and bottom landing.

ALBERTA REGULATION 216/97, SECTION 12 - MAINTENANCE OF ELEVATORS, DUMBWAITERS AND ESCALATORS

As you are probably aware, Alberta's Section 12 was adopted in November 1997. Clause 12.2.2 in the regulation states - On and after November 1, 1998, except for procedures in this Section where time intervals are specified,maintenance inspections shall be carried out at least once every 3 months to ensure compliance with Clause 12.2.1. When adopted, this became the law. In effect, specific procedures set out in the regulation would have to be performed every three months (as underlined above). This did not reflect the intent of the ELEVATORS TECHNICAL COUNCIL. Their intent was that specified procedures be carried out at least once a year unless longer intervals are specified in the regulation.

When we questioned this, we were instructed not to enforce it pending further instructions. Alberta Labour in conjunction with the elevators technical council decided to try to find a way to rectify the problem other than change the regulation (potentially too long to process). We have been working with them on resolving this issue with them over the past months.

As a result, you should be receiving a STANDATA from Alberta Labour in the near future. The STANDATA should effect a province wide variance that will permit the intervals for procedures to be extended by elevator manufacturers, elevator maintenance companies or professional engineers up to one year provided the extension is documented in the log book for the device and signed by both the owner (or the owners agent) the elevator manufacturer, elevator maintenance company or professional engineer making the extension.

Once the STANDATA is issued we will implement measures for compliance.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

Otis_frd

Hollister Whitney

Troubleshooting Suggestions

Quoted from Hollister Whitney "Rope Gripper" Bulleting

Hollister Whitney has encountered, in a few instances, problems with the Hydraulic Cylinder rupturing during the operation of the "ROPE GRIPPER". We have found that the reason for most of these problems is a result of:

  1. Air in the hydraulic Line.
  2. Micro-Solenoid locking unit out of adjustment
  3. Moveable shoe assembly binding on guide pins. (on models #600, 605&610)

We offer the following suggestions should these problems be encountered:

AIR IN LINE

Bleed air by loosening hose at cylinder, then using hand pump, pump until oil comes out of hose at cylinder and no air is evident.

MICROSWITCH OUT OF ADJUSTMENT

Adjust microswitch to 1/32" clearance between latch and trigger to prevent rotating shaft from bottoming out in cam.

BINDING MOVEABLE SHOE

On models #600, 605&610 "ROPE GRIPPER" we have available a Guide Angle to squarely guide the moveable shoe, preventing it from binding on the 4 guide pins.

October 29, 1998 ADVISOR

Escalator Inspection Switches

For Managers or Persons in Charge of Alberta Elevator Contracting Firms

In case you didn't receive one directly from Alberta Labour, attached is a copy of Alberta Labour STANDATA Number ED-98-001-ESC regarding escalator inspection switches. I understand that Alberta Labour mailed it out to escalator owners on October 27, 1998.

In addition, this is to let you know about AEDARSA's policies in this regard as follows:

  1. Escalators for which certificates of construction and alteration are issued after December 1, 1998 will have to comply with Clause 3(2)(a) of Alberta Regulation 216/97per Alberta Labour STANDATA ED-98-001-ESC. As part of acceptance inspections on those escalators that fall within the above parameters, AEDARSA inspectors will be issuing directives as necessary for compliance.
  2. Commencing immediately as part of those in-service inspections of escalators that AEDARSA inspectors perform, they will be issuing directives as needed to gain compliance and providing a copy of Alberta Labour STANDATA ED-98-001-ESC to affected owners along with their copy of the inspectors report.

    To provide a reasonable amount of time for owners to arrange for compliance with these directives, completion dates will be the date that the next annual inspection is due (e.g. June 30th, September 30th, December 31st or March 31st of the following year).

  3. We anticipate that some variances may be requested. Bearing in mind those variance requests must demonstrate equivalent or greater safety compared to exactly meeting requirements, variance applications must give rationale-supporting claims of equivalency. Written applications may be forwarded to either of our offices in Edmonton or Calgary.

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

April 1998 ADVISOR

Hydraulic Elevators - Buried Cylinders

We sincerely hope that this first issue of the ADVISOR provides our clients with information they find useful about elevating devices and their safety. We wish to provide safety and be helpful to our clients in this regard.

Recently we've received a number of inquiries from owners concerned with potential catastrophic failures (bottom blowouts) of buried hydraulic cylinders, particularly older elevators fitted with single bulkheads at the bottom (double bulkheads required by code after 1982). An affected elevator could free fall to the hoistway bottom.

Once installed in the ground, there seems no practical way to determine for certain whether or not cylinders are so fitted. However, while double bulkheads may provide better protection than single bulkheads, in our opinion they do not guarantee protection against catastrophic failure.

Hence, the newest national elevator code (adopted in Alberta) requires sealed PVC jackets surrounding buried hydraulic cylinders with an air space around cylinders on new installations. This applies to replacement cylinders.

While we are aware of no reported cases in Alberta of catastrophic failure, we understand several have occurred in the U.S. and at least one in eastern Canada. So it cannot be denied that the possibility exists here. We would suggest some things could be done to minimize the chance of catastrophic failures of existing cylinders.

First confirm if the hydraulic cylinder is leaking underground. They can be tested (per elevator code procedure) to detect underground leaks. Elevator contractors should perform this work. If a cylinder is proven to leak, then it must be replaced.

For cylinders proven not to be leaking, early detection of leaks can be achieved through frequent regular monitoring and recording of hydraulic oil losses (identified by having to add oil to the system) and the reasons for adding oil. As soon as oil losses cannot be explained (e.g. leaks above ground) then the leak must be below ground. Then the cylinder must be replaced. Elevator contractors should provide this monitoring.

NOTE: Leaks can also occur in buried piping (where equipped) between hydraulic drive pumps and cylinders.

NOTE: For additional protection, down over speed protection devices, offered by some elevator contractors, could be installed. AEDARSA will issue variances that may be required for such devices, provided safety in other affected areas is not compromised. This is not to be considered a substitute for replacing leaking cylinders.

Considering A Modernization?

Most elevators and escalators in Alberta were installed before or during the boom that ended in the early 80's and are aging. The trend toward modernization seems to be increasing.

When modernizing we suggest owners and their agents can avoid increasing their liability exposure (and unnecessary costs of corrections) that can occur through conflicts with safety codes adopted as law in Alberta.

We suggest using reputable elevator contractors and include wording to reflect "all work and equipment must comply with applicable Alberta codes and regulations" in job tender specifications.

Modernization almost always involves major or minor alterations to the equipment. Under Alberta regulations major alterations are subject to an approval process by AEDARSA. The duty rests with owners and contractors to adhere with regulations and adopted safety codes involved when minor alterations are carried out.

One of the most common minor modernizations is to passenger elevators by refinishing interiors of elevator car cabs. This can be subject to adopted codes and regulations. Some of the most commonly overlooked include:

  • specified flame spread and smoke developed characteristics
  • specified safety glass/plastic types for mirrors and enclosures
  • rules limiting elevator car weight increases before load bearing components and counterbalancing (where used) must be evaluated for their ability to handle increased loads
  • rules governing light levels and fixture protection
  • rules governing car top emergency exits and access to them
  • rules governing car cab ventilation

When adding all or some special emergency service (formerly fire-fighters control) features to elevators:

  • numerous and complex safety code rules become applicable to the various elements of such systems when they are installed

Where relay logic control systems are replaced with solid state systems. While a major alteration, in some cases these have been done without following the approval process.

When discovered after the fact, formal acceptance and inspection and tests needed to confirm that equipment is installed as designed and that safety devices and switches and speed control systems function as per code requirements can be both costly and highly inconvenient for everyone involved.

Escalator Safety Enhancement

Sometimes passengers get their feet caught between the steps and side (skirt) panels of escalators. This has resulted in minor cuts and abrasions and occasionally somewhat more serious injuries.

Serious injuries are supposed to be reported to AEDARSA for investigation with a view to preventing recurrences.

The nature of escalators is such that, while restricted to close tolerances by the code, clearance space in this area has not been eliminated. Clearance is needed to minimize wear and noise.

In addition to regular checks and skirt panel adjustments by qualified tradesmen to keep clearances at allowed tolerances, some add-on features might be considered as options to reduce this hazard on older units such as:

  • refinishing escalator skirt panels with low friction surfaces, or alternatively, frequent application of friction reducing agents
  • demarcation markings on step sides and fronts
  • protruding brushes designed for the purpose are available and can be added at side panels that tend to persuade people to keep their feet away from the sides
  • raised plastic type strips on outermost step cleats at both sides with special combplates designed for the purpose are available The raised strips are intended to make it uncomfortable to stand with their feet against the sides.

To avoid introducing other hazards when making changes, always employ elevator professionals and tradesmen

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

April 18, 1998 ADVISOR

Dover Elevators GD45 Machine Gear Mounting Bolt Failure (Newfoundland Elevator Incident)

To: Maintenance Contractors/Accredited Agencies Number: 97-100

Problem

Dover GD45 machines, the bolt heads of the six 5/8" mounting bolts broke below the head, allowing the bolts to work out of the mounting holes of the gear and the spider. This condition allowed the gear to lose solid connection with the spider and cause loss of control between the drive sheave and the worm shaft. (Dover Drawing Number: 501294 attached)

Action

  1. (A.S.A.P.) Please check all GD45 machines and look for loose/broken or missing bolts that connect the gear to the spider. (Remove cover plate and try tightening bolt)
  2. If any broken bolts are located, the device is to be "removed from service" and AEDARSA is to be contacted (sample of damaged bolts required) for further action.
  3. Complete one safety bulletin form per building inspected. Please forward this information to AEDARSA.
  4. If you know of any devices of this type that may not have a maintenance contract, please contact our office so that the owners may have the required inspection carried out.

Device ID Numbers
Building Name
Building Address
Agent/Owner
Inspection Procedure
Inspection Results

If you have any questions pertaining to this newsletter your nearest AEDARSA office can provide assistance.

 

On April 1st every year a Certificate of Operation will be issued to the agent/owner who is then responsible to pay the certificate fee and when necessary have a safety inspection performed by a qualified Safety Codes Officer. An Inspection Notice will be mailed to the agent/owner at the beginning of the assigned quarter for the lift. The lift is assigned to a quarter depending on when it was constructed, its location and when other devices in that building are scheduled. It is important that the agent/owner adhere to the schedule set by AEDARSA. Having the inspection completed and submitted to our office within the timeframe specified on the notice is your legal obligation as outlined in the Safety Codes Act.

Code Regulations For Operation of Elevation Devices

Under Clause 3 (c) of Alberta Regulation 286/2002 of the Safety Codes Act, a person must hold a certificate of operation permit in order to operate an elevating device.

Under Clause 7(1) of Alta Reg 286/2002 the owner of an elevating device or the owner’s agent must apply to a safety codes officer for a certificate of operation permit in accordance with subsection (2) (listed below):

(2) An application for a certificate of operation permit must;

  1. set out all the information necessary to demonstrate compliance with this Regulation and the applicable codes
  2. set out any other information required in writing by a safety codes officer
  3. include a copy of a safety inspection report if it is required by a safety codes officer
  4. be in a form acceptable to a safety codes officer
  5. be accompanied by the applicable fee

 

AEDARSA has been approved by the Minister of Municipal Affairs for Alberta to issue certificates of operation. No other agency may issue certificates, however safety codes officers from agencies other than AEDARSA may perform the inspection to certify the certificate providing a copy of the report is registered with AEDARSA.

The conditions for the certificate of operation are listed on the certificate and are as follows:

  1. The fees per the enclosed invoice are paid in full
  2. Required safety inspections are completed

The frequency of inspections was established with the Safety Codes Council elevators technical division and approved by the Minister to ensure that elevating devices are maintained and operated in a reasonably safe condition.

Guide for Owners and Persons in Charge

When an accident/incident involving an elevating device occurs, the owner or person in charge must report the accident/incident to the Alberta Elevating Devices and Amusement Rides Safety Association. The Association has been delegated by the Minister of Municipal Affairs to undertake accident/incident investigations for the Province.

For accidents/incidents resulting in fatalities, injuries that require medical treatment or serious damage to equipment, the first step is to telephone our nearest office.

Until our safety codes officer completes an investigation of the accident/incident scene, nothing should be touched or removed from the site and the surrounding area unless it is absolutely necessary to prevent further injury, loss of life or property damage. Our safety codes officer will investigate the accident/incident and file a report. The owner or person in charge will be requested to complete this accident/incident report.

For accidents/incidents that require first aid only, it is not necessary to telephone our office but a written report is required.

Under the Safety Codes Act in Section 16 of the Administrative Items Regulation (Alberta Regulation 16/2004), 16. An owner of an elevating device or his agent shall

  • notify an Administrator for the elevating devices discipline or a safety codes officer and the safety codes officer must notify an Administrator for the elevating devices discipline as soon as practicable after an accident/incident involving the elevating device that results in death or serious injury to a person or damage to equipment, and
  • if requested by an Administrator for the elevating devices discipline, submit, as soon as practicable, a full written report of any accident/incident involving the elevating device that results in death or serious injury to a person or damage to equipment.

For your convenience, a format for completing this written accident/incident report is included. To report an accident/incident, or for further information please contact our offices.

Important Notes

  • Reports by phone may be made to any AEDARSA office. After hours emergency service is available

 

  • When a fatal or serious injury accident/incident occurs, the equipment and the accident/incident scene should be secured (no evidence moved or disturbed) from any access except that which is necessary for the immediate medical needs of injured persons or to prevent possible injuries to others. Otherwise, clearance must be obtained from the Safety Codes Officer receiving the immediate report before releasing the equipment and the accident/incident scene.
  • It is historically proven that minor injuries and even near misses can be a result of serious equipment problems. We therefore request that owners also report “Minor” injury accidents/incidents (see interpretations) for evaluation by AEDARSA with a view to further investigation as may be necessary.
  • When a company is contracted to perform maintenance functions on behalf of the owner, as is common practice in the elevator industry, the maintenance contractor becomes an agent of the owner with respect to the equipment they maintain. As such, they also bear a responsibility to report accidents/incidents involving equipment they maintain.
  • Following the report by telephone, a written report (AEDARSA report forms available) is to be forwarded by fax or mail as early as possible.

Interpretations

Accident/Incident – An occurrence which as a result of a persons use of or contact with an elevating device or amusement ride or passenger ropeway results in death or injury; and
- A malfunction or failure of equipment that results in serious equipment damage or that could have resulted in an injury or both

Accident/Incident Categories

Fatal – Where an accident/incident results in the death of a human being.

Serious - Where an accident/incident has resulted in bodily injury such that injured person(s) require medical treatment or hospitalization. Where it is apparent that future complications to injured person(s) may arise, as a result of the accident/incident, the accident/incident should be considered serious.

Minor – Where an accident/incident results in bodily injury that requires minor medical attention.

Serious Equipment Damage – Where an elevating device or amusement ride or passenger ropeway is damaged to the extent that significant repairs are required to restore the equipment to design specifications and/or to fully comply with applicable safety standards.

See Forms below.

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Calgary Office Address
Phone: (403) 216.5750
Fax: (403) 216.5755
209, 264 Midpark Way SE
Calgary, Alberta T2X 1J6

Edmonton Office Address
Phone: (780) 448.0184
Fax: (780) 448.0237
104, 8616-51st Avenue
Edmonton, Alberta T6E 6E6